Tag Archives: diet

Cauliflower Power

Thanks again to Pinterest, I found what seems to be the perfect recipe for cauliflower rice. Now that I’ve tried it, I have a few tips:

  • Use raw cauliflower, not frozen, if you can. It makes for a better grainy consistency. That being said, I will show you how to do it with either fresh or frozen cauliflower.
  • Be careful about the ingredients you use, as cooking the rice is tricky. Cauliflower cooks very fast and can burn before the other ingredients are cooked.

Cauliflower Rice

You will need

  • One head of cauliflower or one 1 lb bag of frozen cauliflower
  • 1/2 sweet onion
  • Any spices or flavorings you’d like
  • Cooking oil or fat

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Step One

Roughly chop the onion and throw it into the processor for a few seconds. Then add the cauliflower and process it until you see a fine grain to the whole batch.

If you’re using fresh cauliflower, chop up the whole head into small chunks. If you’re using frozen, make sure they’re completely thawed, and if there is a lot of excess water, take a paper towel to them to dry them out a bit.

If you’re using fresh, congrats, you’re done! Pick out any large chunks and save your rice for use throughout the week, and skip to step three for tips on how to cook it.

But if it was frozen…

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Step Two (for frozen)

Because of the moisture left after thawing frozen vegetables, you’re going to have to dry these out, unless you plan on having veggie mush for dinner. I spread out the processed onion and cauliflower mix onto a baking sheet and picked out the large chunks. Then I let it sit in a 175° oven for three hours, just until it was dry enough and fluffy–not damp. It turned a little brown, but I was satisfied.

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Step Three

Throw some cooking oil or fat in a hot pan, and cook the rice until it’s heated but still “toothsome.”

If you’re going to add any ingredients to your rice, it might be wise to cook them separately, as we’re obviously not dealing with normal rice here. In order to get the grainy consistency that you’re used to with real rice, you’ll have to use a very hot pan–and this stuff cooks (read: burns) quickly.  Feel free to add spices or flavorings (lemon juice worked really well), but any chunky ingredient will probably not cook as quickly as the rice and might remain raw.

Ex: I didn’t chop my onion very finely, and the chunks ended up practically raw and very strong.

Below my chicken and green beans there is how my rice turned out. If I did it over again I would have chopped my onion more finely, but the consistency was great! It was so fluffy you could use it for stuffing if you wanted to!

Recipe Credit

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Over Easy Made Easy

I can cook and bake up a storm. Mousse? Meringue? Muffins? I got it handled.

The one thing I cannot manage to do, to save my life, is flip over an egg in a frying pan.

Normally I try so hard to get it flipped so that the white actually cooks that I end up breaking it. It ends up looking less like a fried egg and more like a Salvador Dali painting.

Well, good news for people like me!

If you rub some olive oil in a muffin tin, crack an egg into it, and bake it at 350° for 12-15 minutes, you get a beautiful, non-accidentally-scrambled over-easy or over-medium egg! Or a “hard-boiled” egg if you give it another minute or two.

Chicks in a Tin

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Step One

Crack some eggs into an oiled muffin tin and add any spices or flavorings you choose! My favorite was the one with just an olive, honestly.

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Step Two

Bake them for anywhere from 10-15 minutes. The longer you bake, the harder the yolk gets, but be careful to make sure the whole white looks baked before removing them.
IMG_4386Step Three

Enjoy! Or save them and enjoy them later! They should keep for about day.

I’ll definitely be doing this a lot in the future to make breakfast when I have a little bit of extra time to bake these lovelies. If you don’t want to eat them plain, you can always use this as a very decorative way to serve an egg with a meal, or for a neat way to make a breakfast sandwich (if you have a cheat day and some English Muffins!).

-Dee

Source: Pinterest

Bummmmmblebee Tuna!

Okay, it was Chicken of the Sea, but you get the point.

Fish is one my favorite foods, and it’s super healthy too! Even if you sneak a little mustard on top.

tuna

Tuna Patties

3 5 oz. cans of tuna in water (so 15 oz total)
2 eggs
1/2 tablespoon dried dill (or 1 1/2 tbsp fresh dill)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
Coconut oil for cooking

Drain the water from the tuna cans and mix the tuna with the egg, dill, salt, and pepper. Form into 10 small patties and cook in an oiled skillet for about 2 mins on each side. 

This dish is best served with cole slaw, but I had some squash in the fridge so I served mine with boiled squash and garnished it with a bit of dill and some mustard. The recipe calls for dried dill and the use of coconut oil, but I always prefer fresh herbs, and I didn’t feel like driving over to Sprouts for some coconut oil, so I just used olive. 

Source: Everyday Paleo (cookbook) by Sarah Fragoso

“Is Sausage Paleo?”

The answer is yes. So much yes.

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We’re still working on plating, as you can see. But with a little time we’ll be making food that’s both delicious AND pretty.

5-Egg Scramble

5 eggs, beaten and seasoned
1/2 of a turkey kielbasa, sliced
1/4 red bell pepper, sliced
1/4 green bell pepper, sliced
1/2 avocado
Dash of preferred hot sauce

Source: Luke

Add the kielbasa and peppers to a pan lightly covered with olive oil, and as soon as the peppers start to soften, add the eggs and cook until eggs are fluffy. 

Because we just cleaned out the fridge, we also used a little bit of leftover whole milk in the eggs in order to make them fluffy. Normally I would use coconut milk, but this was a special circumstance. 

-Dee

On the Journey to Become Fit Foodies

Who said food-lovers have to be fat?

After living my whole life on the “seefood” diet, I decided it was time for a change. With the help of my boyfriend in teaching me CrossFit and encouraging me to live healthier, I already feel better than I used to. And now it’s time to trim the rest of the fat off of my diet–through Paleo! But just because all the fun foods (dairy, processed sugar, potatoes, and grains) are gone doesn’t mean it can’t be fun to feast.

I’ll post a picture of each of our meals along with the recipe and its source, write about any personal fitness goals I reach, and sprinkle some tips here and there about things I’ve learned.

-Dee