Tag Archives: food processor

Cauliflower Power

Thanks again to Pinterest, I found what seems to be the perfect recipe for cauliflower rice. Now that I’ve tried it, I have a few tips:

  • Use raw cauliflower, not frozen, if you can. It makes for a better grainy consistency. That being said, I will show you how to do it with either fresh or frozen cauliflower.
  • Be careful about the ingredients you use, as cooking the rice is tricky. Cauliflower cooks very fast and can burn before the other ingredients are cooked.

Cauliflower Rice

You will need

  • One head of cauliflower or one 1 lb bag of frozen cauliflower
  • 1/2 sweet onion
  • Any spices or flavorings you’d like
  • Cooking oil or fat

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Step One

Roughly chop the onion and throw it into the processor for a few seconds. Then add the cauliflower and process it until you see a fine grain to the whole batch.

If you’re using fresh cauliflower, chop up the whole head into small chunks. If you’re using frozen, make sure they’re completely thawed, and if there is a lot of excess water, take a paper towel to them to dry them out a bit.

If you’re using fresh, congrats, you’re done! Pick out any large chunks and save your rice for use throughout the week, and skip to step three for tips on how to cook it.

But if it was frozen…

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Step Two (for frozen)

Because of the moisture left after thawing frozen vegetables, you’re going to have to dry these out, unless you plan on having veggie mush for dinner. I spread out the processed onion and cauliflower mix onto a baking sheet and picked out the large chunks. Then I let it sit in a 175° oven for three hours, just until it was dry enough and fluffy–not damp. It turned a little brown, but I was satisfied.

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Step Three

Throw some cooking oil or fat in a hot pan, and cook the rice until it’s heated but still “toothsome.”

If you’re going to add any ingredients to your rice, it might be wise to cook them separately, as we’re obviously not dealing with normal rice here. In order to get the grainy consistency that you’re used to with real rice, you’ll have to use a very hot pan–and this stuff cooks (read: burns) quickly.  Feel free to add spices or flavorings (lemon juice worked really well), but any chunky ingredient will probably not cook as quickly as the rice and might remain raw.

Ex: I didn’t chop my onion very finely, and the chunks ended up practically raw and very strong.

Below my chicken and green beans there is how my rice turned out. If I did it over again I would have chopped my onion more finely, but the consistency was great! It was so fluffy you could use it for stuffing if you wanted to!

Recipe Credit